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Environmental Terminology and Discovery Service (ETDS)

 
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eutrophication
A process of pollution that occurs when a lake or stream becomes over-rich in plant nutrient; as a consequence it becomes overgrown in algae and other aquatic plants. The plants die and decompose. In decomposing the plants rob the water of oxygen and the lake, river or stream becomes lifeless. Nitrate fertilizers which drain from the fields, nutrients from animal wastes and human sewage are the primary causes of eutrophication. They have high biological oxygen demand (BOD). (Source: WRIGHT)

Terminology source: http://www.eionet.europa.eu

A process of pollution that occurs when a lake or stream becomes over-rich in plant nutrient; as a consequence it becomes overgrown in algae and other aquatic plants. The plants die and decompose. In decomposing the plants rob the water of oxygen and the lake, river or stream becomes lifeless. Nitrate fertilizers which drain from the fields, nutrients from animal wastes and human sewage are the primary causes of eutrophication. They have high biological oxygen demand (BOD). (Source: WRIGHT)

Terminology source: http://www.semide.net

Excessive enrichment of waters with nutrients, and the associated adverse biological effects. [definition source: dataservice, http://dataservice.eea.eu.int]

Terminology source: http://glossary.eea.europa.eu

- nutrient enrichment, typically in the form of nitrates and phosphates, often from human sources such as agriculture, sewage, and urban runoff. - process by which a lake, a river, part of a sea, etc. is enriched with nitrates, phosphates and other nutrients which favour the growth of algae and often kill other organisms by lack of oxygen. [JVG]
A process of pollution that occurs when a lake or stream becomes over-rich in plant nutrient; as a consequence it becomes overgrown in algae and other aquatic plants. The plants die and decompose. In decomposing the plants rob the water of oxygen and the lake, river or stream becomes lifeless. Nitrate fertilizers which drain from the fields, nutrients from animal wastes and human sewage are the primary causes of eutrophication. Source: http://www.eionet.europa.eu/gemet/concept?cp=3007&langcode=en

Terminology source: http://www.eea.europa.eu

Excessive enrichment of waters with nutrients, and the associated adverse biological effects. [definition source: EEA. 1994. European rivers and lakes. EEA Environmental Monographs 1.]

Terminology source: http://glossary.eea.europa.eu

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